Special Journal-Only Promo for Writing Fiction

In today’s Journal * Note * The Bradbury Challenge Writers Reporting * Special Journal-Only Promo for Writing Fiction * Promo Doc for Writing Fiction * Of Interest * The Numbers Note Yesterday under Numbers I added a line for “Additions to the nonfiction book” but I forgot to add the number. I corrected that omission in today’s Numbers. Also, one more major change to the book. I retitled it. The title is now Writing Fiction. I know. Haughty of me, isn’t it? I don’t care. All fiction is character-driven. Some of you probably don’t like me saying that, but it’s … Read more

Updated TOC for Writing Character-Driven Fiction

In today’s Journal * Quotes of the Day * Reminder * Note * Updated TOC for Writing Character-Driven Fiction * That’s It! * Of Interest * The Numbers Quotes of the Day “Welcome to my world. When it comes to climbing the sheer rock face of a mountain or sky diving or giving birth to another human being, would-be writers are fine, but faced with putting words on the page, they’re a trembling mass of fear. That’s how strongly imbued the myths are in society.” Me in response to a comment on yesterday’s post (also included in Writing Character-Driven Fiction) … Read more

Appendix C: Rules of Writing from Masters

In today’s Journal * Imortant Updates * Appendix C: Rules of Writing from Masters * Of Interest * The Numbers Imortant Updates In tomorrow’s post, you will see the vastly updated TOC of Writing Character-Driven Fiction. The current book is around 44,000 words. (Writing the Character-Driven Story was only 17,000.) I’ve added the difference (27,000 words) to my Nonfiction numbers below. I’ve finished writing the book. Only cycling and getting my first reader’s input remains, and I’m in no rush. (Yes, I’m cycling. I suppose it’s my Writing Instructor character. Conscious-mind editing is too exhausting.) The ebook version will release … Read more

Appendix B: Some Fiction Exercises

In today’s Journal * Appendix B: Some Fiction Exercises * Of Interest * The Numbers Appendix B: Some Fiction Exercises Note for Journal readers: This is currently one of only three appendices in the older book, Writing the Character-Driven Story. It will become Appendix E (one of eight appendices or more) in Writing Character-Driven Fiction. What follows are two of the more important writing exercises I have ever learned or taught. I hope you will take advantage of them. First, an exercise to get you started actually writing. 1. On a sheet of paper, write down three character names. They … Read more

Appendix A: Examples of Hooks

In today’s Journal * Appendix A: Examples of Hooks * Of Interest * The Numbers Appendix A: Examples of Hooks Note for Journal readers: This is currently one of only three appendices in the older book, Writing the Character-Driven Story. This appendix harkens back to Chapter 5: Writing the Hook. You might want to re-read that chapter, then come back to this. This appendix won’t appear in Writing Character-Driven Fiction. Instead I’ll include a few hooks in the chapter on Writing Hooks. But for now, since I already said I’d share these with you, here you go: All of the … Read more

Chapter 9: Writing the Ending, Part 2

In today’s Journal * Quote of the Day * This Is Overdue * Chapter 9: Writing the Ending, Part 2 * Of Interest * The Numbers Quote of the Day “Excited for the plotting and outlining features? Can’t wait for collaboration with your co-authors, beta readers, and the rest of your author team?” from an email update from Atticus describing their new platform. I could only shiver. Well, and unsubscribe. Atticus will be of no use to me. Your results might differ. This Is Overdue BREATHE: Living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, written by my dear friend Kenneth Flowers, is … Read more

Chapter 9: Writing the Ending, Part 1

In today’s Journal * Quotes of the Day * The Novel Wrapped * Chapter 9, Part 1: Writing the Ending * Of Interest * The Numbers The Novel Wrapped Blackwell Ops 20: Soleada Garcia: Into the Future wrapped (see Numbers below). As soon as the first reader returns his input to me, I will send it to all those who took advantage of the sale. I also probably will set aside writing fiction for a short while in order to finish Writing Character-Driven Fiction. I want to get it finished and out. Again, I will continue the sale on the … Read more

Chapter 8, Part 2: Writing High-Action Scenes

In today’s Journal * The Bradbury Challenge Writers Reporting * Chapter 8, Part 2: Writing High-Action Scenes * Update * Of Interest * The Numbers Thought of the Day Like you and everyone else, I have been absorbing Story and all its aspects from every direction since I was a young child. The difference in us as writers is only that I trust that. The Bradbury Challenge Writers Reporting During the past week, the following writers reported their progress: Short Fiction Balázs Jámbor “Ghosts and loves” 2800 Superhero fantasy George Kordonis “Eyes Like Blue Alabaster” 3216 Urban Fantasy Adam Kozak … Read more

Chapter 8, Part 1: Writing the Scene

In today’s Journal * Notes * Reminder * Chapter 8, Part 1: Writing the Scene * Of Interest * The Numbers Notes 1. A few days ago in my ‘spare time,’ I started compiling Writing Character-Driven Fiction in Word docs, and reality hit: It might be longer than the two months I planned before the whole thing is finished and out. I still have one chapter to finish writing (on Cliffhangers) as well as five new chapters (so far) to compile and write, and five new appendices to compile and write. I’m still writing fiction, of course, and that comes … Read more

Chapter 7, Part 4: Using the Five Senses

In today’s Journal * A New Story * Chapter 7, Part 4: Using the Five Senses * Of Interest * The Numbers A New Story “The Cycle of Ramón,” the seventh story in an interconnected series of ten magic realism stories, went live yesterday on my Stanbrough Writes Substack. If you enjoy magic realism, you probably don’t want to miss this series of stories. Chapter 7, Part 4: Using the Five Senses When describing setting, most writers use only the sense of sight. They’re leaving a LOT of the story in their head. To make the setting (and the scene) … Read more